How to Wear a Mask

by andrew forsyth

Here are some dos and don’ts of wearing a mask.


DON’T: 

Wear the mask below your nose.


DON’T: 

Leave your chin exposed.


DON’T: 

Wear your mask loosely with gaps on the sides.


DON’T: 

Wear your mask so it covers just the tip of your nose.


DON’T: 

Push your mask under your chin to rest on your neck.


✔️DO: 

Wear your mask so it comes all the way up, close to the bridge of your nose, and all the way down under your chin. Do your best to tighten the loops or ties so it’s snug around your face, without gaps.


And once you’ve figured out the correct position for wearing your mask, follow these tips to stay safe:

  • Always wash your hands before and after wearing a mask.
  • Use the ties or loops to put your mask on and pull it off.
  • Don’t touch the front of the mask when you take it off.
  • If you wear glasses, try moving the bridge a little farther down your nose on top of the mask to reduce fogging or get anti-fog spray to clean them with
  • For apartment dwellers, put the mask on and remove it while inside your home. Elevators and stairwells can be high-contamination areas.
  • Wash and dry your cloth mask daily and keep it in a clean, dry place.
  • Don’t have a false sense of security.

“Wearing a mask takes some getting used to, for sure,” said Dr. Scott Segal, chairman of anesthesiology at Wake Forest Baptist Health. “You are probably wearing it exactly right if it’s a little stuffy.”

One of the biggest mistakes people make is that they fidget with their masks and pull them under their noses or completely off their faces to rest under their chins.

“You should absolutely not be pulling up and putting down your mask while you’re out,” said Shan Soe-Lin, a lecturer at the Yale Jackson Institute for Global Affairs. “If you’re going to go to the trouble of using a mask, leave it on.”

Masks offer limited protection and work better when combined with hand washing and social distancing. “It’s not that one excludes the other,” said Dr. Siddhartha Mukherjee, assistant professor of medicine at Columbia University. “They compound the effects of the other.”

ILLUSTRATIONS BY ELENI KALORKOTI

Article content from Tara Parker-Pope of the New York Times

it has been a while

image of an open blank lined notebook page overlaid with text.
in brush font "it has been a while"
below in sans serif font: "so far 2019 has been a bit shit, so I've been hiding under my duvet - sue me"

I Made: Laundry Powder

I recently experimented with making my own washing powder after watching one of those videos on Facebook:

I had bought a 2kg bag of Baking Soda/Bicarb on Amazon for… something (??)… a while ago, so figured that all I needed was a bar of soap and I would be golden. I got myself a bar of Dr Bronner’s Organic Lavender Soap and used some Lemongrass oil I had around. The smell is DIVINE!!

I used the simple recipe from the video and have been using 2-3 Tablespoons per load. Doing the maths, it works out to £0.30-£0.50 per wash. This is significantly more than the own-brand non-bio we usually use, which I tend to dilute to almost nothing at all by the end of the month. The way it usually goes, I split one fresh bottle between two bottles and top them both up with water and keep diluting throughout the month to, ideally, make one bottle last all month – which is a long way of saying I am CHEAP about laundry soap. I started doing it ages ago when we were really REALLY broke and because my eldest has eczema and this seemed to help, I just kept it up… also, I am cheap AF.

So – this stuff is more expensive and it is more work… but it is also much less plastic! And it really does smell lovely and works as well or better than what I was using.

I miss the ability to dilute it – so I did some searching and found this recipe for Liquid Detergent which I am going to try later this month.

Hat-tip to my friend C. who originally posted the video x

Happy New Year! – a happy 2018 photoblog

This past year has been challenging AF. But when has a year NOT been challenging AF? This has also been a year of incredible growth and change. This post is to look back at the many bright spots along the way. xo K

01/18

02/18

03/18

04/18

05/18

06/18

07/18

08/18

09/18

10/18

11/18

12/18

Holidays/Holigays 2018

Introduction part 2

As I mentioned in the first part, I am a bit of a world politics (and history) nerd now and that shit gets scary sometimes.

To cope with my anxiety and to manage my Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, I take drugs (#noshame) and I make things. Last summer, while recovering from a frying pan-related back injury, I taught myself crochet. When I am able to sit (which is much more often now), I love to sew. My favourite things to make are small quilts that make for super cute scarves (Etsy) and I use my skills around the home LIBERALLY. I prefer upcycling things because it makes me feel warm and fuzzy to keep things out of the landfills.

And with the state of the world… I will take whatever warm fuzzies I can get! It’s a big part of what this blog is all about – surviving and (hopefully) thriving in an increasingly uncertain world.

So what will this blog be about? Excellent question!!

I don’t know. BUT. It will have stories about my journey through 2019 – a year where we might leave the EU and the world might go to war, and white nationalists might take over (they won’t… right?). It will also be about things like

  • getting fit as a fat woman without dieting
  • gardening for food as a terrible gardener
  • saving money without compromising ethics
  • pictures of us for my mother to show to my 95 year old Oma
  • nerdy shit like book reviews
  • my thoughts about things
  • unschooling teens
  • feminism
  • LGBTQ+ stuff
  • AND CAT MEMES!

xoxoxoxox Kate

Introduction part 1

Hello, my name is Kate and this is my blog.

I am a 39 year old cis white lady who lives where the Thames meets the Sea. I spent my first 31 years in Canada before uprooting with my husband and two small children to follow my dream of living in London. We only meant to stay for two years… but we fell in love with an eclectic town an hour outside of London and put down roots. The kids have now lived in the UK longer than they lived in the country of their birth. It’s hard to believe it’s been eight years since we leapt into the unknown.

And oh, how very unknown it has been! We came to the country at the start of austerity. We have watched our adopted home change in ways we could never have imagined. We have watched the entire world change in ways we couldn’t dream of. It’s been scary, overwhelming, upsetting, and inspiring.

We have dealt with health issues, economic issues, immigration issues, and education issues – and that’s just at home. I grew up in a politically engaged family (actually, in a way I grew up in two separate politically engaged families) – and as a form of rebellion/self-preservation, I tuned politics WAY out for years. I don’t think I voted until I was well into my twenties – I was a queer kid in Calgary, Alberta… I genuinely didn’t see the point.

All of that changed in 2004. The Iraq war was an obvious disaster and I was pregnant. I’ve been a nerd all of my life and applied that nerdy passion to politics and activism.

PART TWO